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The Herman J. Loemker Collection

Description

The Herman J. Loemker Collection
Description
Rev. Herman J. Loemker, a German-born pastor, served in eighteen German Methodist Episcopal churches in Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin and South Dakota from the 1880’s until his death in 1937. While he utilized lantern slides for temperance lectures, he also produced lantern slides illustrating the communities where he lived. He served as pastor of the German ME church in Dubuque from 1915 to 1917. Nearly 270 of his glass lantern slides depicting Dubuque and a few of the surrounding communities are now in the collections of the Loras College Center for Dubuque History. These include Sunday school parades, churches, schools, buildings, steamboats, rural scenes, road construction, and some unique images of train wrecks, Union Park, and the horse racing track at Nutwood Park. The images offer a snapshot of life in Dubuque from the pre-World War I era to the early 1930’s.

The William J. Klauer Collection

Description

In May and June of 1912, two itinerant photographers arrived in Dubuque and began shooting the photographs that would become the Klauer Collection. For three weeks they traveled throughout the city with a large-format camera and a magnesium-powder flash lamp taking approximately 440 photographs of workers in factories, offices, shops, saloons and even the operating room at Mercy Hospital. We don't know the photographers' names, although they each posed as customers as needed, leaving us with several self-portraits. This type of workplace photography was not unusual in 1912 – itinerant photographers traveled the country photographing cities large and small. However, the fact that most of the glass negatives did survive together, intact for 100 years, is unusual. Itinerant photographers could not carry their solid glass plates with them and instead sold them to junk dealers who scraped the emulsion clean and resold them. Fortunately, the Dubuque photographers sold the plates to Peter Klauer, then President of Klauer Manufacturing Company, who stored them in one of his warehouses. In the 1970s, at least two sets of contact prints were made and in the 1980s, Peter’s grandson, William, donated a set of contact prints to the Center for Dubuque History. Later, 330 of the glass plates - all that remained - were also donated.